Thursday, October 23, 2014

How to Make Pumpkin Dog Treats



Intro


Pumpkin is a great source of fiber not only for people, but also for dogs. If your dog has tummy issues, adding a scoop of pumpkin to his dry food could help calm the belly and firm up any loose stools. But some dogs simply don't enjoy the taste of plain pumpkin. For those finicky pups, you can take a stab at baking your own pumpkin dog treats. Not only is baking for your pets fun, but homemade treats are free of additives and preservatives which makes them healthier than store bought treats.

Pumpkin Dog Treat Recipe
How to Make Homemade Pumpkin Dog Treats

Step 1:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Step 2:

Combine pumpkin, cinnamon and egg in the bowl of a stand mixer, or a large bowl if you are mixing by hand. Mix until blended.

Pumpkin, egg and cinnamon in mixing bowl.


Step 3:

Add flour 1/2 cup at a time into the bowl until stiff dough forms.
 
Mix until stiff dough forms.


Step 4:

Roll the dough out onto a lightly floured surface to about 1/2 inch thick.

Roll out dough on a slightly floured surface.

Step 5:

Use small cookie cutters to cut the dough into bite sized treats.

Fun cookie cutters make your treats festive!



Step 6:

Line dog treats 1/2 inch apart on a non-greased cookie sheet. These treats won't expand so you don't have to worry about them being so close together.

Don't worry about spacing the treats close together.

Step 7:

Bake for 25-30 minutes or until treats are golden brown. Turn the oven off and leave the treats in the oven for 1-2 hours to allow them to become crunchy. Then remove from the oven and let cool.

Cool treats before storing.


Step 8:

Store treats at room temperature in an air tight container for up to 2 weeks, or store in the fridge for up to a month.

Monday, October 20, 2014

16 Common Dog Myths



Not sure what to believe when it comes to the health of your dog? Well, look no further! Petplace.com helps to put a muzzle on the myth.


1. Dogs should have a litter before they are spayed.
This is not true. Dogs that have a litter before they are spayed are not better for it in any way. In fact, spayed dogs are at lower risk for breast cancer and uterine infections.

2. Dogs are sick when their noses are warm.
The temperature of a dogs nose does not indicate health or illness or if they have a fever. There is an "old wives tale" that cold wet noses indicate health. And Warm or dry noses indicate a fever or illness. The only accurate method to access a dog's temperature is to take it with a thermometer. Normal dog temperature is 100.5 to 102.5 degrees F.

3. Mutts are always healthier than purebred dogs.
This is not true. Both mutts and purebred dogs can be unhealthy. Both can have diseases, however, mutts generally do not have many of the genetic diseases common in purebred lines.

4. All dogs like to be petted on their heads.
Some dogs do like to be petted on their heads but many do NOT.

5. Happy dogs wag their tails.
This may be true but aggressive dogs often wag their tails too. There are several physical body motions and cues that help dogs to communicate their intent. A wagging tail can mean agitation or excitement. A dog that wags his tail slowly and moves his all rear end or crouches down in the classic "play bow" position is usually a friendly wag. Tails that are wagged when held higher, twitches or wagging while held over the back may be associated with aggression.

6. Only male dogs will "hump" or lift their leg to urinate.
This is not true. Female dogs, especially dominant female dogs, will lift their leg to urinate and "hump" other dogs or objects. This can be true even if they are spayed.

7. Table scraps are good for dogs.
Some table scraps such as bones and pieces of fat can be dangerous to some pets. They may not digest the bones and the fat may cause gastrointestinal problems such as pancreatitis.

8. Garlic prevents fleas.
Garlic has not been proven to be helpful for flea control. Large amounts of garlic can even be harmful.

9. Household "pet dogs" don't need to be trained.
This is not true. Every dog should be trained.

10. Dogs eat grass when they are sick.
Dog descended from wild wolves and foxes that ate all parts of their "kill." This included the stomach contents of many animals that ate berries and grass. Many scientists believe grass was once part of their normal diet and eating small amounts is normal.

11. Dogs like tasty food.
Dogs have very poor taste buds and eat primarily based on their sense of smell.

12. Licking is Healing.
It is natural for a dog to lick its wound but this not necessarily always "healing." Too much licking can actually prohibit healing.

13. Dogs will let you know when they are sick.
This is not true. Dogs generally are very good at hiding that they are sick by survival instinct, thus not to appear vulnerable to "prey." Often by the time they show you that they are sick, their disease or condition is quite advanced.

14. Dogs that are mostly indoors don't need heartworm prevention.
This is not true. Indoor pets are also at risk for heartworm disease. Heartworm disease is spread by mosquitoes which can come inside.

15. Dogs eat rocks, lick concrete or eat their or another animals stools because of nutrient imbalances.
No one knows why dogs eat "stuff" that they shouldn't eat. Some veterinarians believe that some dogs that eat "things" may be trying to get attention or acting out of boredom. It is important for dogs to eat a well balanced diet that will fulfill their dietary and nutrient requirements.

16. Dogs don't need to housebroken--they naturally know where to go.
Oh, if only this were true. You need to train your dog on where to go. This preferably happens when you start young and give him positive encouragement for jobs well done.

Funny Dogs Wearing Costumes Compilation

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Introducing Your Dog to a New Dog



A brown Pug and white Chihuahua rest their heads on something furry
As of 2007–2008, there were nearly 75 million pet dogs in the United States, living in nearly 45 million U.S. homes. Although the majority of dog guardians (63%) own just one dog, 25% own two, and 12% own three or more. So if you’ve decided to get a second or third dog, you’re in good company!

Adding another dog to your household can bring you and your current dog more fun and companionship. However, it’s important to realize that your current dog, might feel similar to how you might feel if your parents picked your friends and then told you to share your toys with them. In the long run, things will probably work out fabulously, but in the beginning it’s a very smart idea to take a few extra steps to make everyone feel good about the new arrangement. This article provides some guidelines for making smooth and safe introductions and ensuring that your dogs’ relationship gets off to a great start.

Maximizing the potential for a great relationship between your new dog and your current dog is a two-step process. It involves the actual introduction and then management of the new dog in your home. We’ll start with introductions and then give you guidelines for helping your dogs through the initial transition weeks of being together in your home.

Introductions

·         Leave your current dog at home when you pick up your new dog. One of the worst things you can do is to just throw the two of them together in your car and hope for the best!
·         Introduce your dogs on neutral territory, like on a short walk through your neighborhood, in a nearby park or in a friend’s yard. Have two people, one to handle each dog, while keeping the dogs on leashes.
·         To minimize tension, try to keep the dogs’ leashes loose so that they’re not choking or feeling pressure on their throats.
·         Don’t force any interaction between the dogs. If the dogs ignore each other at first, or if one dog seems reluctant to interact with the other, that’s okay. Give both dogs time to get comfortable. They’ll interact when they’re ready.
·         Make the introduction positive and light-hearted. As the dogs sniff and get acquainted, encourage them in a happy tone of voice. At first, allow just a few seconds of sniffing. Then gently pull the dogs away from each other and let them walk around with their handlers. After a minute or two, you can lead the dogs back together and allow another several seconds of sniffing. These brief greetings help keep the dogs’ interactions calm and prevent escalation to threats or aggression. You can also interrupt their interactions with simple obedience. After a brief sniff, lead the dogs apart, ask them to sit or lie down, and then reward them with treats.
·         Closely observe the dogs’ body language. Their postures can help you understand what they’re feeling and whether things are going well or not. Loose body movements and muscles, relaxed open mouths, and play bows (when a dog puts his elbows on the ground and his hind end in the air) are all good signs that the two dogs feel comfortable. Stiff, slow body movements, tensed mouths or teeth-baring, growls and prolonged staring are all signs that a dog feels threatened or aggressive. If you see this type of body language, quickly lead the dogs apart to give them more distance from each other. Again, practice simple obedience with them individually for treats, and then let them interact again—but this time more briefly. Please see our Canine Body Language article for illustrations of dogs showing what various feelings look like in dog body language.
·         Once the dogs’ greeting behaviors have tapered off and they appear to be tolerating each other without fearful or threatening behavior, you’re ready to take them home. Before you take them inside, walk them together around your house or apartment building.
·         Be patient. Bringing a new dog home requires that everyone make some adjustments, especially your current pets. And it will take time for your dogs to build a comfortable relationship.

The First Couple of Weeks at Home

·         It’s crucial to avoid squabbles during the early stages of your dogs’ new relationship. Pick up all toys, chews, food bowls and your current dog’s favorite items. When dogs are first forming a relationship, these things can cause rivalry. These items can be reintroduced after a couple of weeks, once the dogs have started to develop a good relationship.
·         Give each dog his own water and food bowls, bed and toys. For the first few weeks, only give the dogs toys or chews when they’re separated in their crates or confinement areas.
·         Feed the dogs in completely separate areas. Pick up bowls when feeding time is over. (Some dogs will compete over bowls that recently contained food.)
·         Keep the dogs’ playtime and interactions brief to avoid overstimulation and overarousal, which can lead to fighting.
·         Confine the dogs in separate areas of your home whenever you’re away or can’t supervise their interactions.
·         Give your new dog his own confinement area. When the dogs are separated, it might be a good idea to let them get to know each other through a barrier, like a baby gate. Your new dog should be gated in his confinement area, and your current dog should be free to move around and visit when he wants to.
·         When the dogs are interacting, interrupt any growling or bullying behavior with a phrase like “Too bad,” and then quickly separate them for several minutes. Then allow them to be together again. If your dogs seem to react poorly to each other often, don’t hesitate to contact a professional who can help you, such as a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB), a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB) or a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT) who’s experienced in treating problems between dogs. Please see our article, Finding Professional Help, to locate a professional in your area.
·         Be sure to sincerely praise your dogs when they are interacting nicely.
·         Spend time individually with each dog. Give each of them training time with you and playtime with other dogs outside your home.
·         If your dogs are very different in age or energy level, be sure to give the older or less energetic one his own private space where he can enjoy rest and down time.