Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Homemade Candy Cane Dog Treats




  • 3 cups whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup powdered milk
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 2 large eggs (set one aside for egg wash)
  • 1 tsp. Peppermint oil
  • red food coloring (optional)
Whisk all your wet ingredients together until well combined.

Add dry ingredients, one at a time, stirring between each addition to incorporate.

Knead dough on floured surface for 2-3 minutes.

Divide dough in half, make a well in one half and add the peppermint and food coloring-working it in and adding food coloring until desired color is reached.

Place both dough rolls back into bowl, cover, and refrigerate for 1 hour to firm dough.

Preheat oven to 350°.

Cover a cookie sheet in foil and spray with nonstick cooking spray.

Whisk egg for wash in a small bowl.

Remove dough from refrigerator, break each dough color up into an equal number of pieces- about a Tbsp. or so in size-depending on the size of the recipient.

Roll each ball into a small snake-like shape.

Work on a long sheet of wax paper creating candy canes to prevent sticking- dough will still be somewhat sticky and that is normal.

Twist one of each color together and bend the end to create a hook shape.

Place your “Candy Cane” on the foil lined baking sheet.

Brush each with egg wash.

Bake for 10-12 minutes.

Cool completely and store in an airtight container.

I think a dozen or so of these would make an adorable gift for a friend or family members treasured pet, tied up in a cellophane goodie bag or in a pretty glass jar with a handmade tag.

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Army Veteran Finds His Dog At A Shelter After Four Years Apart



Army veteran John Russo thought he had seen the last of his American bulldog mix Bones. His ex-girlfriend had taken in the dog when he joined the military four years earlier, and he didn’t think she would want to give her back.



Army veteran John Russo thought he had seen the last of his American bulldog mix Bones. His ex-girlfriend had taken in the dog when he joined the military four years earlier, and he didn’t think she would want to give her back.

He left the Army earlier this year, and when he got his own place, he started to think about getting another dog. He turned to his local animal shelter, the Flagler Humane Society. On their website, he saw Bones.

“Her face was there,” he said. “It just popped right up.”

His ex had given up the 6-year-old dog in September, signing off that she could no longer be responsible for Bones, Flagler Humane Society executive director Amy Carotenuto said.

“I don’t know why you would give up a dog like Bones,” she said.

Bones became a favorite among the shelter staff, spending time in their administrative area. She was well-trained and quiet inside, and also loved to play Frisbee, Carotenuto said.

“She obviously was well cared for,” she said.

After seeing her on the site, Russo arrived at the shelter thinking that his former pet wouldn’t remember him. In the four years he had been in the military, he had only seen her briefly a couple times while he was on leave.


After seeing her on the site, Russo arrived at the shelter thinking that his former pet wouldn’t remember him. In the four years he had been in the military, he had only seen her briefly a couple times while he was on leave.

Bones started barking when she saw him, and running around. He dropped to his knees, and she jumped up, putting her paws on his shoulders like a hug, Russo said.

“Just pure joy,” he said.

It was a reunion that almost didn’t happen. In the two and a half months Bones was at the shelter, she had been briefly adopted.



It was a reunion that almost didn’t happen. In the two and a half months Bones was at the shelter, she had been briefly adopted.

The family brought her back when she and their other dog didn’t bond, Carotenuto said.

“It’s just a meant-to-be that she was still here,” she said.

In the week since she’s been home, Russo said she’s settled into a routine of walks on the beach and sprawling on his bed. However she got to the shelter, he said he’s just happy to have her back.

In the week since she’s been home, Russo said she’s settled into a routine of walks on the beach and sprawling on his bed. However she got to the shelter, he said he’s just happy to have her back.



“That’s all I really care about,” said Russo, who is training to become an EMT and firefighter. “I’m happy if she’s happy.”

Sunday, December 07, 2014

Watch How This Dog Grow Up in 23 Seconds!



Sophia, a beautiful Rhodesian ridgeback, grows from 2 months to 3 years old in this glorious video. Make sure to watch the bloopers at the end!

Saturday, December 06, 2014

Dogged Determination: Pet Found Days After Disappearing Following Crash

A Watertown family was devastated Thanksgiving afternoon when their 8-year-old dog escaped from a car after a crash north of Baraboo.

Joe DeCono, 25, was driving into town with the two family dogs Thursday when his vehicle was hit by a truck outside of a roundabout near Moon Road.

Both airbags deployed, and Ginger, a vizsla, escaped through a partially open car window. Moose, a labrador-German shepherd mix, stayed in the car, said Joe’s mom, Michele DeCono, originally from Baraboo.

Ginger made it across a two-lane road and four-lane highway. DeCono said her husband, Dave; son, Joe; and brother, Rick Faith tracked the dog from the site of the crash for miles, but lost track of her near the woods by Camp Gray.

“Then it got dark,” Michele DeCono said. She said she was thinking about the dog’s short hair, hoping the beloved pet had found a space to keep warm for the night.

“She doesn’t have any hair,” DeCono said of the breed.

She took to social media, and by the next morning, with the help of Baraboo Scanner’s Facebook page; a buy, sell, trade page; Lost Dogs of Wisconsin; and Animal Advocates of Sauk County, Ginger’s story had been shared more than 2,000 times.

“Everyone was looking for her, and somebody was nice enough to put her on the radio,” said DeCono.

The search continued throughout the area, moving into Saturday.

“The prayers were going in hot,” DeCono said, quoting her daughter, Ricky, 17.

Michele DeCono said the family’s beagle and yellow lab died in a house fire in 2006 after their home had been struck by lightning.

She remembered thinking, “we can’t lose another dog this way.”

On Saturday evening, a sheriff’s deputy called the DeConos to tell them someone had located Ginger.

Michele DeCono said the dog was found at a residence in the area of North Reedsburg Road near the intersection of Hope and Joy roads, miles from the site of the accident.

When the family arrived on the scene, Ricky DeCono crawled beneath the deck where Ginger was hiding to help coax the frightened dog out.

Michele DeCono said she believes social media was responsible for Ginger’s safe return.

“(There’s) no doubt in my mind,” she said.

DeCono’s parents, Kenlynn and Dick Faith; sister Amy Faith; brother, Rick Faith and his girlfriend Lisa Rhoades; and family friend Sherry Ferguson helped search for the dog, along with the DeConos.

The dehydrated dog has been recovering at home with the help of some sirloin tip meals. Ginger suffered frostbite and dehydration and lost 11 pounds in the two days she was missing, but her veterinarian said she is expected to make a full recovery.

“We’re totally thrilled to have her home,” Michele DeCono said. “She has not left the front of the pellet stove.”


Wednesday, December 03, 2014

How To Help Your Local Animal Shelters This Holiday Season



Between six to seven million dogs and cats enter shelters across America each year. The U.S. has at least 70 million stray cats alone; many stray animals are most likely “lost pets who were not kept properly indoors or provided with identification.”

There are nearly 3,500 animal shelters across the country that are providing care and comfort to those animals. In the spirit of the holiday season, consider these ways of giving back and helping out an animal in need through your local shelter, as told to BuzzFeed from the Humane Society of New York:

1. Give a monetary donation.
























Check your local shelter’s website for exact information of how to donate; there may be a special fund for a specific animal or a general donation pool. (If you’re interested in donating, HSNY recommends checking Charity Navigator first to make sure it’s a legitimate destination.

2. Spend a little time as a volunteer.
























Get in contact with your shelter’s volunteer coordinator to see what they need. Every pair of helping hands will be super appreciated!

“Sometimes it’s walking dogs, sometimes it’s cleaning cat cages, sometimes it’s at a special event,” said HSNY. “You never know exactly what they might need.”

3. Donate new (or used!) goods/items/supplies.

















There are so many things required to keep a shelter healthy and thriving. These can even be items you’ve previously owned/used. Many shelters have wishlists online just for this purpose.

In case you need some inspiration, here are some ideas of what to donate:

Paper towels

















Old dog beds/crates


















Bags/cans of pet food








 










Shelving units/cardboard boxes


















Old towels/sheets/linens

















This is a great time, if you happen to be in the process of buying new linens, to donate your old ones. They go to a good home and you get rid of some clutter!

Old newspapers

























Just in case your recycling pile is stacking up.

4. Spread the word.

By sharing or posting about an adopted pet or a nearby shelter, you can remind someone to help a fuzzy friend in need.

5. Use your other talents.


















Are you great at designing things? Or maybe you have a really popular ~online e-zine blog~? Take your other talents and see how you can put them to use for your local shelter. Reach out and see if they could work with you and your awesome ideas!

6. Don’t wait!

It’s #GivingTuesday, a time set aside after the days and days of sales in stores for everyone to think about donating to those in need.