Tuesday, December 29, 2015

23 Reasons Every Kid Should Grow Up With A Dog

1. To be a patient for an aspiring doctor



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2. To help fight crime and save the planet



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3. To be a practice canvas before the real one



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4. To hold secret meetings inside their cone of shame



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5. To help take the blame when there's a mess



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6. To pray with



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7. To help babysit when mom and dad need a night out



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8. To give Eskimo kisses



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9. To be their lounge chair while watching toons



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10. To play cops and robbers



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11. To be their 'show and tell' at school



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12. To help construct new toys



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13. To be the pony every little kid desires



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14. To help spy on the cute girl who lives next door



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15. To help with those long drives



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16. To be their portable body pillow



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17. To always be by their side



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18. To help with grooming



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19. To plan a safe escape route



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20. To be their dalmation after watching 101 Dalmations



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21. To wear funny hats with



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22. To play outside in the cold snow



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23. And to be that extra boost when they just can't reach



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Thursday, December 24, 2015

The Reality Of Your Weekends


Friday Night


 Saturday Morning


Saturday Afternoon

  

Saturday Night


Sunday Morning

Sunday Afternoon

  
Sunday Night



Friday, December 18, 2015

Treat Your Dog This Season: Banana Carrot Dog Treats

Banana Carrot Dog Treats Ingredients:

  • 1 cup Whole wheat flour
  • 1 cup quick cook oatmeal
  • 1 banana
  • 2 carrots
  • 2 Tbsp. coconut oil
  • 1 Tbsp. brown sugar
  • 1 Tbsp. parsley
  • 1 whole egg

Banana Carrot Dog Treats Directions:

Shred carrots on grater, or you can finely chip in processor.
Puree banana in blender or processor until smooth.
Combine all ingredients in a medium sized bowl and stir until well combined.
Flip dough out onto a well floured surface.
Press flat with your hands to 1/4” to 1/2” thickness, cut out dough using a cookie cutter in your desired shape.
Place carrot cookies on greased baking sheet and bake in oven preheated to 350° F for 30 minutes.
At this point you can pull cookies out for a slightly soft cookie, or turn off oven, crack door and allow cookies to remain in oven for an additional 20 minutes to become hard.
Store in airtight container in refrigerator for a week or freeze for up to 3 months.

Source

Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Puppy Emotions of 2015: It's Been A Busy Year!

 1.) Confident
2.) Tough
 3.) Patient & Wit
4.) Confused
 5.) Content
6.) Regret
 7.) Apologetic

Photo Source

Saturday, December 05, 2015

Redemption Tale: A Murderer, a Dog and an Autistic Child

Since 1998, Chris Vogt has been serving a 48 year prison sentence in Colorado’s Sterling Correctional Facility for second degree murder. He’s been using that time to make some kind of cosmic amends, to turn his life around by helping others who need it. How?

Vogt is part of a program called “Colorado Cell Dogs” that trains abandoned canines to work with the blind and deaf. Vogt’s focus, however, is a little different.

As reported by ABC News, “With nothing but time on his hands, [Vogt] read all he could about autism, and came up with unique training techniques for service dogs–aimed at helping autistic children overcome behavioral and emotional issues. The dogs come from local shelters and Vogt trains them inside his cell, acting out problem behaviors himself. He trains each dog to meet a specific child’s need. He taught one dog to help nuzzle a child, so she would sleep at night. And he trained another to nudge and snap a child out of his fits and tantrums.”

Nine autistic children have been helped so far, including Zachary Tucker, age nine. Zachary’s anxiety was so bad that he often couldn’t function and he refused to be touched. Desperate for help, the Tucker family started traveling 200 miles on weekends to Sterling Correctional Facility to work with Vogt and his newest dog, Clyde.

Clyde learned to “nudge and poke” Zachary whenever he sensed the boy’s anxiety building, and so far the approach has worked wonders. Zachary, who eventually took Clyde home with him, told ABC News, “My anxiety has been brought down by at least 70 percent and I’ve been calm enough to socialize with kids, which I haven’t been able to do in a long time.”

When ABC News traveled to the prison with the Tucker family, they witnessed the boy who never liked to be touched give Vogt a hug. Vogt said, “This is the thing I do to give back. When Zach and even the other kids get to work with me, they don’t get to see the murderer. This has given me a chance to do something better.”

Source

Friday, December 04, 2015

A Dog Love Story

Abby and Riley lived through the worst days of their lives together—homeless and hungry, they were strays for a long time.

When Alycia and Rebecca of Animal House TV heard about the two dogs entering the Adams County Pet Rescue, they noticed the first thing the staff did was separate them.

Soon enough the ladies got wind that Abby was scaling the walls of her kennel each night, only to be found sitting outside Riley’s kennel each morning. It was like nothing they’d ever heard.

Once in a while, while you’re searching for hours through adoptable PetFinder dogs (everyone does that, right?), you’ll spot what a shelter labels as a bonded pair. These are two dogs who may have grown up together, were found together, or may have been surrendered together, and just simply refuse to be separated.

They are truly bonded—just like two friends or siblings.

It’s great for a dog to have a partner, especially when everything else in their lives seems to be in constant flux, but it quickly becomes a disadvantage for potential adopters. Only rarely do families open their home to two dogs at once, and while people like this are difficult to find, it would be exponentially worse to split up two strongly bonded dogs.

Sadly, this is exactly what happened to Abby and Riley; while Abby went through further training to become “adoptable,” Riley’s social personality put him right under the noses of waiting families. He was adopted to one family, and Abby to another.

Fast-forward six months, Alycia and Rebecca discover two things: 1) Abby’s family wants a second dog, and 2) Riley’s family just returned him to the shelter. Is it fate? Well, you’d be hard-pressed to find a reason to deny it!

Source